Evocative Fragments: Edward Lear

When awful darkness and silence reign
Over the great Gromboolian plain,
Through the long, long wintry nights; —
When the angry breakers roar
As they beat on the rocky shore; —
When Storm-clouds brood on the towering heights
Of the Hills of the Chankly Bore: —

Then, through the vast and gloomy dark,
There moves what seems a fiery spark,
A lonely spark with silvery rays
Piercing the coal-black night, —
A Meteor strange and bright: —
Hither and thither the vision strays,
A single lurid light.

It is, of course, the Dong With a Luminous Nose, wandering crazed through the forests seeking the Jumblie Girl he fell in love with. Edward Lear’s verse is known for its frivolous characters, actions and names, and his scribbly little drawings. But ignore the drawing and note the skill and control, the emotional pull, of the two stanzas above (even if he does sabotage them with words like “Gromboolian”). Similarly he was a remarkable artist when he wanted to be: one of the world’s great ornithological painters, a wonderful landscape artist, and well-enough respected to have given Queen Victoria a dozen lessons in drawing and watercolours in 1846.

Nonsense poetry in itself is a wonderful way to introduce children to literature, if it is handled as skilfully and, yes, emotionally as Lear does with his nonsense poems of travel, romance, heartbreak, and finding (or failing to find) lasting happiness.

1 thought on “Evocative Fragments: Edward Lear

  1. inbohemia593012171

    Fascinating post. Though I just did a modern “Instagram Era” version of “The Owl and the Pussycat” — which I have not sent out because formal verse venues are drying up — I wish I had thought of some Lear-ian neologisms for my rhymed poem, i.e., Chankly Bore. Even in parody, alas, I am not Lear-ian enough. Am I leery? I will exit before you are weary.
    * * Question: what’s the next theme for Potcakes, please? — from LindaAnn
    @Mae_Westside (Twitter)
    ― Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ ―

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